Tesla’s Self-Driving Beta Is for Safe Drivers Only—Unless You Cheat

2021 Tesla Model 3
Tesla

Suppose you want to take part in Tesla’s latest full Self-Driving beta. In that case, you have to be eligible by having a good Safety Score, a program that rates drivers on several metrics, which the car automatically records. Naturally, Tesla only wants safe drivers enjoying this new software, but it sounds like some owners are cheating.

At first, drivers found all sorts of ways to game the system, but now, according to Vice, Tesla owners are resetting the score completely to get a clean record. Several YouTube videos and a now-deleted Reddit thread explained things in further detail. Some drivers avoid the data being sent to Tesla completely, while others are resetting it, driving better, and then joining the beta.

Remember that it’s still a hefty $10,000 upgrade to get the full self-driving package, on top of the perfect safety score, so this isn’t giving ordinary drivers access to the software suite. Instead, it’s simply allowing people that regularly wouldn’t be able to join to gain eligibility.

Tesla Full Self-Driving display
Tesla

If a driver makes a few mistakes or breaks some rules that would knock down the score, a quick long-press on both scroll-wheel buttons on the steering wheel can wipe the car’s Media Control Unit. This quick move deletes the Safety Score, too. Unfortunately, that’s just one of many ways users are circumventing the safe driving record system.

Another reason for cheating the system is it could lower a poor driver’s insurance premium. In the past, Elon Musk said everyone with a perfect score would get access to the FSD Beta and earn large discounts on their Tesla car insurance plan.

The EV-maker could roll out some sort of software update to block these cheats, but for now, anyone can Google a few tricks and earn a perfect safety score.

via CNET

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

The above article may contain affiliate links, which help support Review Geek.