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Lenovo Introduces Two 43-inch Ultrawide Monitors: One for the Gamer, One for the Office


Ultrawide monitors are all the rage, and now even bigger versions (Megawide? Magnawide?) are becoming surprisingly common. Lenovo is unveiling two 43.4-inch wide monitors here at CES, one in the business class ThinkPad lineup and one in the LEGION gaming sub-brand.

The monitors are designed with the intention of replacing a dual-screen setup, and with a resolution of 3840×1200, they’re the equivalent of dual 24-inch monitors side by side. Naturally, they’re curved with a 1800R factor to make all that screen real estate easier on the eyes. HDR and 450-nit peak brightness, a maximum refresh rate of 144Hz, and 4-millisecond response time are spec headlines, but there are some excellent extras outside of the main panel.

The inputs are varied, including double HDMI, DisplayPort, and USB Type-C with 90 watts of power output to charge your laptop. The displays come with an integrated USB hub, too, with two ports and a headphone jack that are right beneath the center of the bottom bezel. Not using them? They fold up into the body when not needed—a very classy touch. An optional Harman Kardon speaker bar integrates into the sturdy central column of the stand.

Both monitors can use an optional Harman Kardon soundbar and have fold-up USB ports.

Lenovo’s software allows for easy picture-in-picture, plus virtual monitor spaces to more effectively manage windows on the wide space—a branded version of a DisplayFusion trick. Both panels will support AMD’s FreeSync 2 for smoother gameplay, though the exclusion of NVIDIA’s G-Sync on such expensive monitors is a bit of a let-down. Speaking of which: the ThinkVision P44w, with pre-configured color certification and a three-year warranty, will be available in April for $1300. The LEGION Y44w, sans certification and with a 1-year warranty, will go for $1200 at the same time.

For those who want a tighter package and demand NVIDIA G-Sync, Lenovo is also offering the LEGION Y27gq. It’s smaller at 27 inches, with the popular QHD (2560×1440) resolution for a good balance between framerates and sharpness. The panel is rated for 240Hz of refresh, four times the typical 60fps target for most games, with a response time at half a millisecond. (Yes, .5ms.) You’ll need an absolute unit of a gaming PC to take advantage of it.

That makes the price a little more understandable: at $1000, it’s among the most expensive 27-inch gaming monitors on the market. Lenovo is hoping some neat extras, like a subtle and stable stand, ultra-thin bezels, and a fold-out hook for hanging your gaming headset, will make up the difference. While this model dispenses with USB-C connection—not a popular one for gamers, anyway—it can use the same detachable speaker bar as the larger monitors. It will hit the market in April.


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