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Soundpeats T3 Wireless Earbuds Review: Packing in Serious Value

Rating: 9/10 ?
  • 1 - Absolute Hot Garbage
  • 2 - Sorta Lukewarm Garbage
  • 3 - Strongly Flawed Design
  • 4 - Some Pros, Lots Of Cons
  • 5 - Acceptably Imperfect
  • 6 - Good Enough to Buy On Sale
  • 7 - Great, But Not Best-In-Class
  • 8 - Fantastic, with Some Footnotes
  • 9 - Shut Up And Take My Money
  • 10 - Absolute Design Nirvana
Price: $40
SoundPEATS T3 in their case
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

We’ve seen incredible advancements in wireless earbuds in recent years, at every price point. The Soundpeats T3, part of the latest generation, prove you don’t have to spend hundreds on earbuds to get a lot of good stuff. At around $50 (or less), the T3 offer a wallop of value for those on a budget.

It wasn’t long ago that features like the T3’s active noise canceling and transparency mode were unheard of below the $100 price tag. Add in convenient controls, a sleek and comfy design, and surprisingly balanced sound, and the T3 help to redefine what we’ve come to expect from budget buds.

While they obviously can’t compete with the best wireless earbuds from brands like Apple, Sony, or Bose, the Soundpeats T3 are a great way to dip your toes in the wireless earbuds water. And at this price, what’s not to like?

Here's What We Like

  • Balanced, punchy sound
  • Near-comprehensive controls
  • Solid Bluetooth connection
  • Comfy, lightweight design
  • ANC and Passthrough mode

And What We Don't

  • No app or EQ
  • No auto-pause
  • Case battery is just okay

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Quick Setup, Compact Package

Contents of SoundPEATS T3 Box
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

  • Weight: Earbud: 4.6g (.162oz), Charging case: 46g (16.2oz)
  • Dust and water resistance: Earbuds: IPX4
  • Controls: Touch-sensitive gesture area

The Soundpeats T3 arrive in a nimble, soft-cardboard box. Their light and compact charging case immediately recalls flagship models like Samsung’s Galaxy Buds 2 Pro. At a fraction of the cost, there are some obvious compromises, including the case’s cheaper, scratch-ready exterior, but it’s a relatively sleek package.

Opening the lid reveals a grey lining, with the short-stemmed earbuds resting on their magnetic terminals. The earbud design is an obvious shoutout to another big name, Apple’s Airpods Pro, with similar weight and overall styling—a common theme in this segment.

As for pairing, while they don’t offer a one-touch connection like AirPods or Google’s Fast Pair, the earbuds instantly go into pairing mode, and once you’ve connected to your device over Bluetooth, they auto-pair remarkably quickly.

Accessories include three sets of ear tips, a USB-C charging cable, and basic instructions.

Light and Airy Fit

Person using SoundPEATS T3 earbuds
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

The AirPods Pro are among the comfiest buds out there, and a good deal of that boils down to their weight of just over five grams. The T3 are even lighter, and combined with their ergonomic housings, it makes for a very smooth ride, even for extended periods.

I was able to wear the T3 for their entire playback cycle without complaint. Their fit also proved relatively stable, able to hang on for a couple of miles on the treadmill without issue, as long as I didn’t get too sweaty.

Ample Features, Loaded Controls

Person using touch controls on SoundPEATS T3
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

While there are a lot of good things in this package, you’re giving up a fair few convenience features at this price. There’s no wireless charging for the case, for instance, or any form of auto-pause, meaning you’ll need to be diligent about hitting the pause button.

More notable for me, though, is the Soundpeats T3’s lack of a mobile app, which nixes everything from a mobile quick-start guide and battery gauge to menus for basics like EQ and firmware updates. That’s to say nothing of fancier fare such as 3D audio or multi-point pairing. But let’s be real, this is a budget package, after all.

The T3’s ANC and transparency mode (aka Passthrough) help make up for those shortcomings, as does their adoption of Bluetooth 5.2 for an extremely solid connection. I’m also happy you can use either earbud on its own, which is a lot more useful day-to-day than you might think.

The Soundpeats T3’s controls may be the top of the stack for me. Unlike plenty of models at all price points, the touch controls are nearly comprehensive, letting you tap and hold for volume control, play/pause, song skip, ambient audio, calling, and voice assistant. The only thing missing is song back-skip, but I’m happy to pull out my phone for that one.

It’s worth noting that the control layout is a bit odd. Unlike most buds which use a single tap for play/pause, a tap on the left or right side lowers or raises the volume respectively. This can sometimes read as a double tap, which controls play/pause instead. Unlike other controls, there’s also no built-in tone for volume, which initially confused me.

A Helpful Layer of Noise Canceling

Rear close up of the SoundPEATS T3
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

The Soundpeats T3’s noise canceling is far from topflight, but it is a step or two above entry-level—impressive at this price. The buds do a better job than plenty of models from a year or two ago, even some costly ones, offering decent relief from bassy sounds and a light dab of suppression for higher ambient noises as well.

You’ll hear a major improvement across frequencies from aging flagships like Jabra’s Elite 85t (often on sale for just over $100). And if you really need powerful noise canceling, Bose’s new QuietComfort 2 and the AirPods Pro (gen 2) are leagues ahead of both (at much higher pricing).

That said, this is real noise canceling, and taking the T3 for a venture around my neighborhood revealed some notable moments of sonic solitude. They offered instant relief from the leaf blower a few hundred yards down the road, while cars rolling by a busy street were notably cushioned, especially with light music playing.

The T3’s passthrough mode performed similarly. It introduces white noise and rolls off higher frequencies a fair bit, but it does its job of keeping you environmentally aware.

The Best Wireless Earbuds of 2023

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Soundpeats T3
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Soundpeats T3
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Middling Playback Time, Short Case Battery

Indicator light on SoundPEATS T3
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

  • Earbud Battery Capacity (Single): 40mAH
  • Case Battery Capacity: 320mAH
  • Earbuds Play Time: Up to 5.5 hours
  • Max Play Time: 16.5 hours (two charges in case)
  • Earbuds Charging Time: 1.5 hours
  • Case Charging Time: 2 hours

The Soundpeats T3’s claimed 5.5 hours of playback per charge was relatively accurate with my testing. You can certainly get more elsewhere, but that’s only a half-hour less than the latest AirPods Pro, and it outdoes plenty of pricier buds, including Samsung’s Galaxy Buds 2. The caveat is the claimed 19 hours total, meaning you’ll get less than 3 recharges from the case. Again, it’s a hit worth taking for the value presented.

Impressive Sound and Call Quality

SoundPEATS T3 in hand
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

  • Driver: 10mm dynamic driver
  • Bluetooth Version: 5.2
  • Bluetooth Codecs: SBC
  • Bluetooth Profiles: AVRCP, A2DP, HFP

The Soundpeats T3 offer punchy sound that’s refreshingly balanced for an entry-level option. It’s all anchored by their robust bass response, which is able to hit with real authority when called upon, without creating the masking or bloating you might expect from cheaper earbuds.

Up above, there’s very little to complain about across the board. You’ll hear present and clear vocals, and even some sparkling moments like the crunch of synths in the breakdown of The Naked and Famous’ “The Sun.” It’s a bass-forward sound, but rarely is anything overtly out of place.

What you won’t get are those head-turning moments that come with top models from Sony, Sennheiser, and Apple. The nickel-steel attack of an acoustic guitar string, the almost visual instrumental placement, or the expanding and contracting dynamics of your favorite tunes.

Then again, if you’ve never heard it, you probably won’t miss it at all. If you’re just after some accompaniment for your workout, dog walk, or podcast time, the T3 are more than up to the job.

The earbuds also performed relatively well for calling on both ends. I’ve had no complaints in the calls I’ve made, and everyone was clear on my end. In my recordings, there’s some noticeable digital interference, but that didn’t seem to translate to real-world use.

Microphone Audio Sample – Quiet Room

Microphone Audio Sample – Moderate Wind

Should You Buy the Soundpeats T3?

Soundpeats T3 laoid out to show shape
Hannah Stryker / Review Geek

If you’re shopping for an accessible, convenient, and balanced pair of budget buds for around $50, I’m not sure you can do better than the Soundpeats T3.

You could almost think of the T3 as the inflatable hot tub of wireless buds. While they’ve got their faults, they offer a brilliant taste of the good life, at a price almost anyone can afford.

If you’re still easing your way into wireless earbuds, or you’re looking for an affordable gift, the Soundpeats T3 are a great way to dive in.

Rating: 9/10
Price: $40

Here’s What We Like

  • Balanced, punchy sound
  • Near-comprehensive controls
  • Solid Bluetooth connection
  • Comfy, lightweight design
  • ANC and Passthrough mode

And What We Don't

  • No app or EQ
  • No auto-pause
  • Case battery is just okay

Ryan Waniata Ryan Waniata
Ryan Waniata has been a professional writer, editor, and product reviewer since transitioning from the wild world of audio engineering in 2012. His portfolio spans the gamut, from entertainment op-eds and trends pieces to gadget how-tos and reviews on TVs, audio gear, smart home devices, and more. His work can be seen on Digital Trends, Reviewed, How-To Geek, and others. Read Full Bio »