Fujitsu’s New Happy Hacking Keyboards Are for the Minimalists

Top view of an updated Fujitsu Happy Hacking Keyboard
Fujitsu

Known for its minimalism, Fujitsu’s Happy Hacking Keyboard (HHKB) line-up hasn’t seen a new addition since 2016 with the Bluetooth-capable Happy Hacking Keyboard Professional BT. That changes today, as Fujitsu announced three new HHKB models: the HHKB Pro 3 Classic, Pro 3 Hybrid, and Pro 3 Hybrid Type-S.

All three keyboards feature USB-C ports, but only the Pro 3 Classic doesn’t have Bluetooth. The Pro 3 Hybrid and Pro 3 Hybrid Type-S support key remapping, though none of the keyboards feature rechargeable batteries. Instead, they all use removable batteries.

Moving to the keys themselves, you can choose printed or blank keycaps. All three also have electrostatic capacitive key switches, which feature a linear design and don’t use physical contact point to trigger a key press. The big advantage for electrostatic capacitive key switches is the way they feel—they deliver a “thonk” sound and feel versus the “click” of normal mechanical switches. You won’t like the new switches if you enjoy the click-clack of a typical office keyboard, but it’s all subjective. On top of that, the Pro 3 Hybrid Type-S features an additional “buffer” to further dampen the sound from key presses.

The biggest point of note is the design. The Pro 3 Classic, Pro 3 Hybrid, and Pro 3 Hybrid Type-S’ layouts remain unchanged from the HHKB models of the 90s. That means these are “60-percent” keyboards without arrow and Windows keys. Some of the main keys double up on their function. For example, the “A” and “S” keys control volume up and down, respectively.

The Pro 3 Classic will be available for $217. The Pro 3 Hybrid and Pro 3 Hybrid Type-S will sell for $264 and $320, respectively. No word on a launch date or region availability, though they’ll be available on Fujitsu’s online store, Amazon, and other retailers.

Williams Pelegrin Williams Pelegrin
Williams Pelegrin is a Staff Writer at Review Geek. He's been covering technology for over seven years and has written thousands of articles in that time. Read Full Bio »

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