New Verizon Fios Customers Will Get Google Stadia Premiere Edition for Free

Two Stadia controllers, one black and one white, on a wooden coffee table.
Stadia

Good news if you’re thinking about switching to Verizon Fios for your home internet service. Starting January 29th, Verizon will give new subscribers a Stadia Premiere Edition bundle for free. All you’ll have to do is order it through Verizon’s My Fios app (for iOS and Android).

Google Stadia is the company’s first effort to wade into the gaming scene. But you don’t buy a gaming console, like Xbox or PlayStation, you stream your games to your existing devices instead.

You’ll need Stadia’s controller, a subscription, a ChromeCast Ultra (at least to play on your TV), and of course, games to play. Stadia Premiere Edition gives you exactly that, including five free games and three months of Stadia Pro subscription. All in all, it’s a $129 value, which isn’t bad if you wanted internet service anyway.

After the three months of service is up, you’ll have to pay your own way ($10 a month)—at least until Stadia’s upcoming basic free tier arrives.

You Don’t Need the Top Tier Fios Service for Stadia

Google Stadia is a game streaming service, so it needs a fast internet connection. But Verizon Fios is well up to the task. Google says you need a 10 Mbps connection for 720p streaming, and a 25 Mbps connection for 4K resolution with HDR and 5.1 surround sound.

The slowest Verizon Fios package promises four times that speed, at 100 Mbps down and up. You can, of course, step up to Gigabit speeds. It’s not necessary for Stadia, but if you have more internet-connected devices than you do fingers and toes, you’ll feel the difference greater speeds provide.

Unfortunately, the free Stadia Premier Edition deal appears to be for new subscribers only. As usual with ISP’s, new customers get better deals than existing users. And that’s a crying shame.

Source: 9to5Google

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

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