Samsung Revealed the Galaxy Z Flip in a Commercial Days Before Announcing It

Several Galaxy Z Flip phones, some folded open and some partially closed.
Samsung

If you skipped the Oscars last night, you missed a surprise from Samsung. We’re just a day away from the company’s Unpacked 2020 event, where we’re expecting to see new phones launched, but the company decided not to wait. Last night anyone in the U.S. watching the Oscars got to see the Z Flip in all its glory.

If you weren’t expecting to see a commercial for an unannounced phone at the Oscars, you aren’t alone. But in a blink and miss moment, Samsung gave us the clearest view of its upcoming Galaxy Z Flip phone yet. And while the 30-second spot didn’t reveal specs or pricing, it did confirm a few things.

As rumored, the Z Flip’s form factor differs vastly from the Galaxy Fold and more closely resembles Motorola’s Razr foldable.  Rather than act as a smartphone that folds out into a tablet, it appears to go the opposite direction. When you’re using it, it will look like a smartphone; when you finish, you’ll fold it down like a flip phone.

While the phone’s (simulated) screen looked nice in the commercial, the tiny text tells us more. Squint, and you’ll spot the words, “You may notice a crease at the center of the main screen, which is a natural characteristic of the screen.”

The Z Flip doesn’t appear to fold as flat as the Razr either, with just a hint of V-Shaped hump that’s reminiscent of the Surface Book. And it looks like you’ll have some color choices (including purple) if you’re brave enough to jump on the company’s second folding phone.

The commercial didn’t tell us anything substantial like a release date or carrier information. But we’re expecting to hear more at Samsung Unpacked event tomorrow (February 11th) at 2 p.m. Eastern.

We’ll be there, ready to bring you all the details and (fingers crossed) hands-on impressions.

via The Verge

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

The above article may contain affiliate links, which help support Review Geek.