Spotify’s New Parental Controls Put You in Charge of Your Kid’s Music

The Spotify kids app with a block song option.
Spotify

After launching a new Spotify Kids app last October, Spotify is back with even more controls for parents to love. Now, parents can check in on what songs their children listened to, and if necessary, block songs from future play sessions. Since it’s part of the Kids app, you’ll need a family premium account to take advantage of the new controls.

Spotify targetted its Kids app at children age three and up, so, for the most part, the music is curated. You can even set an age limit to keep the music appropriate to what your child is ready to hear. But curation isn’t perfect, and not every child is the same.

With that in mind, the new parental controls are a welcome (and requested) feature. Now, you’ll be able to check in on your children’s listening history to see what songs they streamed. If you find something inappropriate, you can block the song from future sessions.

The Spotify app with a listening history option.
Spotify

That’s all well and good, but there’s a side benefit we can think of beyond good parenting. Are you sick of hearing Olaf singing When I’m Older from Frozen 2? Have you listened to the even worse version of I Just Can’t Wait to Be King from the “live action” Lion King 80 million times? Well, the new controls will let you block those off for a while. Sometimes parental controls are less about protecting your children and more about protecting your sanity. You can always unblock a song once you’ve had enough of a break.

To access the news settings, you’ll need to go to the “Grown Ups” selection and select the child you want to manage. Spotify says you can access the new controls starting today.

Source: Spotify 

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

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