IFTTT Cuts off Wink While Adding Support for 25 Other Services

A series of IFTTT Wink Shortcuts that no longer work.

IFTTT is a cloud-based service that links together with your disparate smart home devices. It allows gadgets that generally can’t talk to each other to work together for a better smart home experience. Now, IFTTT is adding 25 more services to its repertoire—and cutting off Wink in the process.

To keep up with the ever-changing smart home, IFTTT is continuously adding new connections and removing defunct services. As new companies come along and gain traction, IFTTT will add support (or help the companies add support). If a company goes out of business, IFTTT will cull it. That’s part of what makes IFTTT work so well.

In its latest round, the service is adding 25 new connections. Notably, Intellithings RoomMe hardware is on the list. RoomMe hardware keeps track of your location in your home. As you enter or leave a room, it will turn on and off devices, or start and stop your music. You just need to carry a phone or smartwatch.

With IFTTT support, RoomMe’s capabilities grow significantly, as it was limited to specific smart home hubs, Philips, and Sonos devices. Other services added include, Hella Onyx, Filtrete Smart, Seitron Smart, TRIGGERcmd, City of Beverly Hills, ThingaOS, ASUS ZenEye, Link My Pet, and more.

But while IFTTT is adding support for more services, it’s also removing some defunct services. Most of the entries aren’t surprising, Automatic shut down after all. But Wink is notable because the company is still around.

Recently, Wink decided to add mandatory subscriptions to its service with seven days’ notice, then it delayed that another seven days, and now the plan is on indefinite hold. The company has struggled to turn a profit and grow, and losing IFTTT integration is one more blow to the beleaguered smart home outfit.

IFTTT’s latest integrations are available starting today.

via Android Police

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

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