Lenovo’s Latest Laptops Turn Themselves On When You Come Near

A Lenovo ThinkPad X13 Yoga, T14s, and X13 side by side.
Lenovo

Lenovo ThinkPads are well-known and well-regarded work machines, but that doesn’t mean they don’t come with fancy features. In its latest series of updates to the ThinkPad lineup, Lenovo added human detection and a fingerprint reader in the power button to its popular T14s, X13, X13 Yoga laptops.

Sometimes boring is a good thing, especially when you’re looking for a laptop that does all the things and lasts as long as you need it. That’s where Lenovo ThinkPads come in. While the X1 Extreme model deserves its name, the other ThinkPads are more likely to earn a place in your work life or even daily driver life.

So it’s a good idea to keep an eye on the latest updates to the ThinkPad line. Lenovo bumped specs across the board to embrace the latest processors, both Intel and AMD, better monitors, and Wi-Fi 6. That last spec makes the laptops future-proof; as your Wi-Fi gets faster, the Lenovo laptops will keep up.

But the T14s, X13, X13 Yoga updates land the most interesting new features. They’ll retain the same basic look as the previous models, though the X13 and X13 Yoga will move to 16:10 aspect ratios. Along the way, they pick up human presence detection. As you approach the laptop, it will wake itself up to make getting to work that much faster.

They also come with a fingerprint reader that doubles as a power button, a pretty handy feature for anyone who prefers fingerprints to face unlock (especially in mask-wearing times). And if you need the oomph, the T-series laptops have an optional NVIDIA GeForce MX450 graphics card add-on.

Intel-powered ThinkPad T14s will be available in March starting at $1,499, while AMD-powered T14s will arrive in May at $1,279. The Intel-powered X13 Yoga arrives in April for $1,379, while the AMD version of the X13 will come out in May for $1,139.

Source: Lenovo

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

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