New Teslas Have PS5-Level Gaming Power Thanks to AMD

Tesla in-car entertainment system
Tesla

Last year Tesla’s Elon Musk promised that the new Model S and Model X would have a built-in gaming rig powerful enough to play AAA games like the Witcher 3. It turns out he wasn’t joking, as AMD just confirmed it’s supplying PlayStation 5-level entertainment power to Tesla.

By new, we’re talking about the “Plaid” redesign for the Model S, the first major update since it launched in 2012. Tesla is making a lot of changes to its next vehicles, and apparently, that includes stuffing AMD’s RDNA 2 graphics inside.

This week, AMD revealed some key details about what’s actually happening during the annual Computex event. Stating that the upgraded Tesla infotainment system consists of an AMD Ryzen processor with its own graphics combined with a discrete AMD RDNA 2 GPU. And yes, the RDNA 2 is what’s powering the PlayStation 5.

“We actually have an AMD Ryzen APU powering the infotainment system in both cars as well as a discrete RDNA2-based GPU that kicks in when running AAA games, providing up to 10 teraflops of computing power.” AMD CEO Lisa Su further went on to say the company “looks forward to giving gamers a great platform for AAA gaming.”

To be clear, we’re not entirely sure yet how Tesla plans to offer a game like Witcher 3 in the vehicle. Whether that’s a custom-built version of games running on Linux, as hinted at below, or some other plan.

The thought of actually being able to play a PS5-level game in a car is pretty neat. So long as owners can use the big main infotainment display and the smaller rear screen.  Either way, Tesla’s new Model S and Model X are on track to become vehicles with the most advanced infotainment systems available.

via The Verge

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

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