Fujifilm Taken Down as Global Ransomware Spree Continues

Fujifilm camera
Fujifilm

Fujifilm, the global film company based in Japan, has shut down parts of its network worldwide after apparently being the latest victim to a ransomware attack. The company is still trying to figure out the scale and extent of the attack, but here’s what we know.

This year we’ve seen an increasingly high number of ransomware attacks, and it doesn’t look like they’ll be slowing down anytime soon. These attacks have targeted everyone from Apple, the Colonial Pipeline, Ireland’s health services, and more recently, the JBS meat processing company and now Fujifilm.

In a statement earlier this week, Fujifilm said the company is “currently carrying out an investigation into possible unauthorized access to its server from outside of the company.” Then continued by saying that due to the investigation, “Fujifilm’s network is partially shut down and disconnected from external correspondence,” while noting it had suspended “all affected systems in coordination with our various global entities.”

According to a notice on the company website, the headquarters in Tokyo got hit by a ransomware attack on June 2. Furthermore, due to the system going down, sub-divisions around the world are experiencing problems. Fujifilm’s USA offshoot added a similar notice to its website, claiming that it’s dealing with problems that have impacted all communication types.

We’re not entirely sure what’s going on yet, but according to various reports, the Qbot trojan infected Fujifilm back in mid-May, and the company is working quickly to resolve the situation. Hopefully, they can get things figured out, get a decryptor, and get back online as quickly as possible.

We’ll report back if we learn more. In the meantime, here’s how to protect yourself from ransomware.

via TechCrunch

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

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