Porsche Recalls 43,000 Taycan EVs Worldwide

Porsche Taycan on the street
Porsche

Porsche just announced a recall for its first full-electric vehicle, the Taycan, to fix a software issue that has been proven to cause a sudden loss of power. The recall is worldwide and spans nearly all of the 43,000 Taycans sold globally.

And while Porsche claims only a small number of users are dealing with the problem, it’s big enough for a recall. Porsche offers over-the-air software updates to fix and improve all aspects of its vehicle. However, this requires owners to take their Taycan into a dealership.

Oddly enough, the power loss problem apparently stems from the regular 12-volt battery that powers accessories like the stereo. According to the NHTSA, over a dozen Taycan owners filed a complaint about the problem. As a result, the agency opened an investigation, and now it looks like a recall is en route.

The agency discovered that the power loss is being caused when the regular 12-volt battery runs out of charge, which shouldn’t happen this often, and causes issues to other areas. If the 12-volt battery dies while a Taycan is moving, it can potentially shut off the rest of the big 800-volt cell that powers the entire vehicle.

Here’s what Porsche had to say:

“Porsche is reviewing and updating the software for the power electronics and the engine control unit on approximately 43,000 units of Taycan and Taycan Cross Turismo vehicles from the 2020 to 2021 model years, of which about 3,400 are in Germany.

In case of the affected vehicles, there is the possibility that in certain instances, a shutdown of the power train, resulting in loss of motive power may be triggered incorrectly and sporadically. A software update will be installed in the workshop.”

As noted above by Porsche, owners must make an appointment and bring the vehicle to a workshop dealer to resolve the problem, rather than getting a simple over-the-air software update.

The same issue also affects the new Audi E-Tron GT, which relies on the Taycan’s electric powertrain. Moving forward, all vehicles from Porsche and Audi on the assembly line will get the fix before leaving the warehouse.

via InsideEVs

 

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

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