Samsung’s New Smartwatch Chipset Might Set a New Standard for Wear OS Devices

Leaked renders of the Galaxy Watch 4 and 4 Classic.
Leaked renders of the Galaxy Watch 4 and 4 Classic. WinFuture

Samsung has announced the new Exynos W920 chipset for smartwatches like its upcoming Galaxy Watch 4 and other wearables. This chip is the industry’s first 5nm-based wearables processor, which should improve performance and battery life.

As many wearable owners know, performance has long been a problem on Wear OS watches. However, Samsung claims 20 percent better CPU performance and 10x better GPU performance than its previous chip from the Galaxy Watch 3.

The W920 even includes a dedicated Cortex-M55 processor for low-power tasks such as the always-on display, further reducing power consumption and increasing battery life. Plus, this is only the third processor that supports Google Wear OS software, which makes it a big deal.

Samsung and Google together for Wear OS
Google

Samsung claims it’ll deliver a huge upgrade compared to Qualcomm’s 28nm Snapdragon Wear 3100 chipset that powers most current watches. We’re hoping this is the new chipset used in most upcoming smartwatches and sets a new standard for WearOS moving forward.

The Galaxy Watch 4 is where we’ll see it first, which gets announced tomorrow. The Galaxy Watch 4 will combine this chip with new software in partnership between Samsung and Google to potentially deliver a better Android smartwatch experience.

For connectivity, the Exynos W920 processor will come with a 4G LTE modem and a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for tracking distance, speed, and even elevation during use. Overall, the Galaxy Watch 4 is shaping up to be an excellent smartwatch.

As a reminder, we’re expecting Samsung to formally unveil the Galaxy Watch 4 alongside two new phones at Samsung Unpacked on August 11th.

In the meantime, you can head to Samsung’s online store and reserve yours today.

Source: Samsung

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

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