T-Mobile’s Data Breach Is Real And Worse Than You Imagined

T-Mobile storefront
Alastair Pike/AFP/Getty Images

Earlier this week, T-Mobile confirmed news and reports that the company had been hacked and experienced a wide customer data breach. And while the company’s findings show not all 100+ million customers are affected, it’s still bad news, and the details are going from bad to worse.

After confirming over 40 million customers’ user data was compromised, on Friday, the mobile carrier reported that hackers illegally accessed customer names, dates of birth, phone numbers, social security numbers, addresses, and even IMEI numbers for customer devices. This includes current, former, and potential customers, as well as postpaid users.

T-Mobile also said it had identified an additional 667,000 accounts of former customers that were accessed. This is bad news as hackers can easily use that info for identity theft, SIM swapping attacks to intercept secure two-factor logins, and other harmful activities.

So far, the number of affected customers is over 50 million. In a press release, the company said it’s taking immediate steps to help protect affected customers and is coordinating with law enforcement.

“We take our customers’ protection very seriously and we will continue to work around the clock on this forensic investigation to ensure we are taking care of our customers in light of this malicious attack,” said the company. “While our investigation is ongoing, we wanted to share these initial findings even as we may learn additional facts through our investigation that cause the details above to change or evolve.”

The company has now opened a dedicated webpage full of information for customers. Here, T-Mobile users can find information on how to change their PIN or passwords or sign up for a complimentary 2-years of McAfee ID Theft Protection services. T-Mobile recommends postpaid customers change their PIN and have already alerted many users or reset it themselves.

via The Verge

Cory Gunther Cory Gunther
Based in Las Vegas, Cory Gunther has been writing about phones, Android, cars, and technology in general for over a decade. He’s a freelance writer for Review Geek covering roundups, apps, and news. He's previously written for GottaBeMobile, SlashGear, AndroidCentral, and TechRadar, and he’s written over 6,000 articles. Read Full Bio »

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