Jabra’s New True Wireless Earbuds Give You a Hearing Boost

 

A pair of true wireless earbuds in a dark case next to a phone.
Jabra

Hearing aids are expensive devices, often going for as much as $5,000. If you only have mild hearing loss, that’s a steep price when you may need just a little help. Jabra’s new Enhance Plus true wireless earbuds might be a good answer, thanks to focusing on hearing assistance.

The Jabra Enhance Plus true wireless earbuds shouldn’t be confused for a hearing replacement, and that’s obvious just by looking at them. They are true wireless earbuds and have all the usual features found in those devices. You can stream music, take phone calls, and connect them to your other devices through Bluetooth.

But they also enhance your hearing, thanks to medical-grade hearing tech built into the Enhance Plus buds. That’s, in part, thanks to Jabra’s experience building actual hearing aids. Like other “hearables,” the Enhance Plus buds pump in sound from around you while trying to enhance speech and kill background noise and other similar goals.

The Enhance Plus buds come with several listening modes for different situations. The adaptive mode will determine what it should enhance for you, while the focus mode will cut out background noise and focus on one particular voice. Surround mode is less about speech and more about hearing the world around you.

Naturally, the buds can also enhance music you’re listening to or phones calls. It accomplishes all those tasks with four built-in microphones. Jabra says the Enhance Plus true wireless earbuds should last about 10 hours on a single charge, and the case will get you up to 30 hours.

What Jabra isn’t saying yet is how much the Enhance Plus earbuds will cost or when they’ll release. But as long as they cost somewhere in the range of other true wireless earbuds and hearables, they could be a good solution for anyone that needs an audio boost.

Josh Hendrickson Josh Hendrickson
Josh Hendrickson has worked in IT for nearly a decade, including four years spent repairing and servicing computers for Microsoft. He’s also a smarthome enthusiast who built his own smart mirror with just a frame, some electronics, a Raspberry Pi, and open-source code. Read Full Bio »

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