Samsung’s Next-Gen RAM Sticks Are Too Powerful for Your PC

Samsung's 512GB DDR5 RAM modules.
Samsung

Samsung’s foothold in the computer hardware market is hard to ignore. Not only does it sell some of the most cost-effective storage and memory modules, but it regularly develops cutting-edge, record-breaking products. The latest Samsung computing product is a 512GB DDR5 RAM module, the first of its kind and an outrageous leap in performance over DDR4 sticks.

The newly-developed DDR5 RAM modules run at 7,200Mbps, offering 40% better performance over Samsung’s DDR4 products (or 57.6 GBps speeds on a single channel). That performance boost comes with more power efficiency, as the DDR5 sticks require just 1.1 volts (a 13% improvement).

Samsung achieved these improvements by stacking eight DDR5 dies, all connected to with TSV (through-silicon via) technology. That’s twice the number of dies that you’ll find in a DDR4 RAM stick, yet Samsung’s DDR5 modules are much denser than previous systems, measuring just 1.0mm wide or 0.2mm thinner than DDR4 sticks.

But who is this for? The average PC has just 8GB of RAM, and you’d be pressed to find a motherboard that supports more than 128GB of RAM. Well, Samsung hopes to use its high-capacity DDR5 modules in “extreme compute-hungry, high-bandwidth workloads,” such as servers, supercomputers, and systems dedicated to machine learning or AI.

That’s a lot of room for growth here, as Samsung claims that its new DDR5 sticks can support a maximum capacity of 768GB. The company is currently sending samples of the RAM to its customers, and unless something goes horribly wrong, 512GB DDR5 RAM sticks may become a common sight in some server rooms.

Don’t worry; Samsung is developing consumer-grade DDR5 RAM modules too. The first DDR5-compatible motherboards and Intel Alder Lake CPUs should launch later this year, along with DDR5 RAM sticks from Samsung, PNY, and other popular manufacturers.

Source: Samsung via PCMag

Andrew Heinzman Andrew Heinzman
Andrew is a writer for Review Geek and its sister site, How-To Geek. Like a jack-of-all-trades, he handles the writing and image editing for a mess of tech news articles, daily deals, product reviews, and complicated explainers. Read Full Bio »

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