Fitbit’s New “Readiness Score” Will Tell You When to Skip Leg Day

Photos of the Fitbit app showing a Daily Readiness Score and suggesting moderate exercise.
Fitbit

When you want to commit to a daily workout regiment, a Fitbit tracker can help keep you accountable. But the newest Fitbit Premium feature might tell you to skip leg day. Daily Readiness Scores, now available for Premium subscribers, uses your activity, sleep, and heart rate metrics to suggest an appropriate workout or a day of rest.

The Daily Readiness Score is similar to Garmin’s Body Battery and Whoop’s Recovery features. Basically, it’s an in-app page that tells you your activity and sleep levels (on a scale from low to excellent) plus your heart rate variability.

These metrics combine to form a Readiness Score, which may fluctuate between “low” and “excellent.” The app will then suggest an appropriate workout for you—if you haven’t had enough sleep, for example, it may ask you to do some yoga instead of going on a run.

And because the Readiness Score is exclusive to Fitbit Premium subscribers ($10 a month), it links directly to Fitbit’s guided workouts. It’s a good idea; you don’t need to plan a workout on the fly, you can just do what Fitbit tells you.

Fitbit says that its Readiness Score feature is “coming soon” to the Fitbit Sense, Versa 3, Versa 2, Luxe, Inspire 2, and the brand new Charge 5 fitness band. If you’re interested in this feature but don’t own a compatible Fitbit, I suggest pre-ordering the new Charge 5, as it has a ton of new health-tracking features and comes with six months of Premium.

Fitbit Charge 5

Shipping in late September, the Fitbit Charge 5 fitness band includes tons of new features, like a full-color AMOLED display, an ECG monitor, and stress tracking. It’s the most smartwatch-like fitness tracker that Fitbit’s ever released, and you can pre-order it now for $180.

Source: Fitbit

Andrew Heinzman Andrew Heinzman
Andrew is a writer for Review Geek and its sister site, How-To Geek. Like a jack-of-all-trades, he handles the writing and image editing for a mess of tech news articles, daily deals, product reviews, and complicated explainers. Read Full Bio »

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